Tsurugaya Project

Green tea consumption and cognitive function: a cross-sectional study from the Tsurugaya Project1–3 Shinichi Kuriyama, Atsushi Hozawa, Kaori Ohmori, Taichi Shimazu, Toshifumi Matsui, Satoru Ebihara, Shuichi Awata,Ryoichi Nagatomi, Hiroyuki Arai, and Ichiro Tsuji ABSTRACT Background: Although considerable experimental and animal evidence shows that green tea may possess potent activities of neuroprotection, neurorescue, and amyloid precursor protein processing that may lead to cognitive enhancement, no human data are available. Objective: The objective was to examine the association between green tea consumption and cognitive function in humans. Design: We analyzed cross-sectional data from a community-based Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) conducted in 2002. The subjects were 1003 Japanese subjects aged 70 y. They completed a self-administered questionnaire that included questions about the frequency of green tea consumption. We evaluated cognitive function by using the Mini-Mental State Examination with cutoffs of28,26, and24 and calculated multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of cognitive impairment. Results: Higher consumption

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Green Tea Catechins Iron Chelator

Green tea catechins as brain-permeable, non toxic iron chelators to ‘‘iron out iron’’ from the brain S. Mandel, O. Weinreb, L. Reznichenko, L. Kalfon, T. Amit Eve Topf and US NPF Centers for Neurodegenerative Diseases and Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa, Israel   J Neural Transm (2006) [Suppl] 71: 249–257 Summary Evidence to link abnormal metal (iron, copper and zinc) metabolism and handling with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases pathology has frequently been reported. The capacity of free iron to enhance and promote the generation of toxic reactive oxygen radicals has been discussed numerous times. Metal chelation has the potential to prevent iron-induced oxidative stress and aggregation of alpha-synuclein and beta-amyloid peptides. The efficacy of iron chelators depends on their ability to penetrate the subcellular compartments and cellular membranes where iron dependent free radicals are generated. Thus, natural, non-toxic, brain permeable neuroprotective drugs, are preferentially advocated for ‘‘ironing

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Neurodegenerative Diseases Etiologies with Multimodal-Acting Green Tea Catechins

Targeting Multiple Neurodegenerative Diseases Etiologies with Multimodal-Acting Green Tea Catechins 1,2 Silvia A. Mandel,* Tamar Amit, Limor Kalfon, Lydia Reznichenko, and Moussa B. H. Youdim Eve Topf Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases Research and Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa, Israel Abstract Green tea is currently considered a source of dietary constituents endowed with biological and pharmacological activities relevant to human health. Human epidemiological and new animal data suggest that the pharmacological benefits of tea drinking may help to protect the brain as we age. Indeed, tea consumption is inversely correlated with the incidence of dementia and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. In particular, its main catechin polyphenol constituent (2)- epigallocatechin-3-gallate has been shown to exert neuroprotective/neurorescue activities in a wide array of cellular and animal models of neurological disorders. The intense efforts dedicated in recent years to shed light on the molecular mechanisms participating in the brain protective action

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Green tea extract

Green tea extract enhances parieto-frontal connectivity during working memory processing Psychopharmacology (2014) 231:3879–3888 André Schmidt & Felix Hammann & Bettina Wölnerhanssen & Anne Christin Meyer-Gerspach & Jürgen Drewe & Christoph Beglinger & Stefan Borgwardt Received: 7 January 2014 /Accepted: 26 February 2014 /Published online: 19 March 2014 Introduction Recent research indicates that green tea extract or its main ingredients has a beneficial impact on cognitive functioning in humans. For instance, it has been demonstrated that the consumption of green tea improved memory and attention in subjects with mild cognitive impairments (Park et al. 2011) and that the consumption of flavonoid-rich foods such as green tea reduced beta-amyloid-mediated cognitive impairments in Alzheimer transgenic mice, suggesting a potential therapeutic utility in dementia (Rezai-Zadeh et al. 2008; Williams and Spencer 2012). Furthermore, higher consumption of green tea has also been associated with a lower prevalence of cognitive impairments in older adults (Kuriyama et

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