Combating Neural Damage

Neuroprotection

The holy grail of neurodegenerative disease research is discovering a pathway to healing—reversing neural damage, either through regeneration or surgical reconstruction. Our nerves control multiple biological functions. The complexity of cranial nerves has made regenerative therapies exceptionally challenging. The olfactory nerve (I) has become a favored model for the study of neural regeneration through the rewiring of axons or surgical transplantation.¹ It contains afferent fibers and is the only identified cranial nerve that may regenerate depending on the type and degree of underlying damage. Cranial nerves are divided by responsibility; afferent nerves control communication by collecting sensory information, while efferent nerves control motor functions. The physical makeup of each is distinct; efferent neurons have short dendrites with a long axon, while afferent neurons have long dendrites and a short axon. Cranial nerves may contain solely efferent fibers, afferent fibers, or a combination of both— making the current methods of repair,

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